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New State Farm® survey reveals what is most important to Latinos when looking to volunteer

Whether it’s serving a meal to someone in need or helping an elderly neighbor with garden clean-up, giving back and contributing to the community is woven into the fabric of Latin American cultures.  A new volunteerism survey conducted by State Farm found that it’s no different for U.S. Hispanics who also value a chance to volunteer.

As part of the State Farm Neighborhood of Good™ initiative, the survey sought to understand how and why people volunteer and identified key factors that influence U.S. Hispanics to volunteer. Key findings include:

When it comes to volunteering, passion matters.

·         Almost three quarters(64 percent) of U.S. Hispanics volunteer because they feel it is important to help others.They want to support a specific cause or a valued interpersonal relationship.

·         Nearly half (41 percent) of U.S. Hispanic respondents value volunteering because it allows them to gain a new perspective on things.

·         U.S. Hispanics believe that volunteering for an organization is as important as or more important than making a financial contribution or donation (33 percent).

A preference for giving back locally and in person

·         Almost half of all respondents (41 percent) prefer to volunteer close to home, in their neighborhood or within their communities versus at a regional/state, national or even international level.

·         Assisting a neighbor with a household project is one of the top three activities considered to be volunteering by U.S. Hispanics, and nearly one in three has volunteered for a neighbor in the past year.

·         The survey also revealed that religious institutions are one of the leading organizations benefitting from Hispanic volunteerism with 25 percent of respondents reporting participation in faith-based volunteerism.

·         The majority of U.S. Hispanics (76 percent) prefer volunteering in person versus online or through a digital opportunity.

·         U.S. Hispanics (74 percent) report that they would like volunteer through a big group event with people they know.

To get families volunteering in their neighborhood during the summer, State Farm is sharing these ideas:

·         Make it a family affair: Ask the kids and extended family members, such as grandparents, to pick a family cause. Whether it’s helping shelter dogs at a nearby shelter or helping at the community garden, finding a cause that the whole family is passionate about will make it easier to rally everyone to participate.

·         Meet your elders: Grab a family board game and sign up to visit a nursing home or assisted-living facility. Often residents look forward to sharing their stories and making new memories.

·         Celebrate culture: Celebrate the family’s heritage by finding charity initiatives that benefit the less fortunate in other countries. Many church groups and organizations have opportunities to make an impact on communities all over Latin America.

·         Get active: Sign-up to volunteer as a family for a charity walk or run. Kids can hand out water or snacks and cheer on participants.

·         Invite others to the party: When celebrating a momentous occasion like graduation or birthdays, consider asking for donations in lieu of gifts, to fill a care package and give to a local shelter or another person in need.

Families can find summer volunteer opportunities by searching NeighborhoodofGood.com related to all of the ideas above and more.

About Survey

In November of 2016, State Farm fielded an online survey of 5,182 (902 Hispanic) respondents across generations. The purpose of the survey was to better understand how and why U.S. residents volunteer and the role that volunteerism plays in communities across the country. The Survey identified who volunteers (and at what level, how much, how often), who does not volunteer, and why they volunteer (motivators) to determine the root causes and give us insights on how to inspire and incent volunteerism.