A mixed picture of Young Hispanics in the U.S.

NPR program, Talk to the Nation, addresses a recent report released by The Pew Hispanic Center about the values, education and employment of Latinos 16-25.  The program highlights that although amongst Hispanics, there are high rates of teen pregnancy, gang affiliation and school dropouts, many young Hispanics are also satisfied with their lives, and highly value education and career success.

Guests:
Mark Lopez, associate director, Pew Hispanic Center
Gustavo Arellano, writes the syndicated column, “Ask A Mexican,” and author of Orange County
Ruben Navarette, nationally syndicated columnist for the San Diego Union Tribune

The future belongs to the young, and so we know that our future will be more and more Hispanic. That counts one of every five kids in school today, one of every four newborns. Last week, the Pew Hispanic Center released an in-depth report that paints a fascinating picture of the values, education and employment of the next generation: Hispanics between the ages of 16 and 25. That includes high rates of teen pregnancy, gang affiliation and school dropouts, but it also finds that the majority of Latino youth speak English as their dominant language, place a high value on education and career success. Contrary to popular assumption, the great majority of young Hispanics are born in the U.S.A. – a portrait of Latino teens and 20-somethings. – Neal Conan, host of Talk of the Nation. To read the full transcript click here.